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The Gulf Coast Community
Protection and Recovery District

UPDATE: STORM SURGE SUPRESSION STUDY PHASE 3 REPORT: RECOMMENDED ACTIONS IS COMPLETE


As the study team moves forward with analysis of possible storm surge suppression alternatives, we encourage and invite your comments on the study. Comments may be submitted through the ‘Get Involved’ page on this website, via email to  info@gccprd.com, or via mail to Gulf Coast Community Protection and Recovery District, c/o Col. Christopher Sallese, 3100 West Alabama St., Houston, Texas 77098.

THE GCCPRD STORM SURGE SUPPRESSION STUDY TEAM is pleased to present the Phase 3 Report: Recommended Alternatives for public review. In Phase 1 of the study, the study team collected and analyzed existing studies, reports, and background data for the six-county study region, and in Phase 2, the team developed two alternatives per study region. We have now reached the end of Phase 3 of the study. During Phase 3, the study team conducted four additional public meetings and facilitated numerous engagements with other stakeholders to gather comments on the alternatives that presented in the Phase 2 Report. As a result of stakeholder input and further analysis, one alternative for each study region has been put forward for the Phase 3 Report: Recommended Actions.

THE GCCPRD PHASE 3 REPORT presents the recommended actions for the Storm Surge Suppression Study. The results of the study clearly illustrate the need for a storm surge protection system in the six-county region to mitigate current and future risks to the public, the economy, and the environment. The recommendations put forward in this report establish a framework for a plan and serve as a call to action for local, state, and federally elected officials to become advocates for coastal protection. The Phase 3 Report is a summary report and does not restate in detail the technical information that was previously published in the Phase 1 and Phase 2 reports. Those reports are included as Appendices B and C to this report.

  • Storm Surge Suppression Study Phase 3 Report: Recommended Actions is available to download here. (4.6 MB)
  • Appendix A – Phase 3 Public Meeting Summary is available for download here. (1.3 MB)
  • Appendix B – Phase 1 Data Report: Data Collection is available for download here. (5 MB)
  • Appendix C – Phase 2 Report: Technical Mitigation is available for download here. (5.12 MB)

- HISTORY -

Following three consecutive hurricanes of which the last, Hurricane Ike, was the most expensive in Texas’ history, Governor Perry issued an Executive Order creating the Governor’s Commission for Disaster Recovery and Renewal.


View the 5-minute Storm Surge Suppression Study Video Introduction.

The Commission worked with local communities, industry, and state leaders to develop recommendations to:

- Help Texas communities rebuild after these storms
- Improve the State’s and communities’ ability to recover from future disasters
- Seek federal reimbursement comparable to that of other states for disaster recovery

One of the Commission’s recommendations was to conduct a study to determine how coastal communities can reduce the impact of water damage caused by future storms.

About The Gulf Coast Community Protection and Recovery District (GCCPRD)


As a result of the Commission’s recommendations, the GCCPRD was formed to help Brazoria, Chambers, Galveston, Harris, Jefferson, and Orange counties develop plans and conduct studies to alleviate damage from events like Hurricane Ike. The GCCPRD is a local government corporation governed by a Board of Directors comprised of the County Judge of each participating county and three additional appointed members serving three-year terms. Former Harris County Judge Robert Eckels was appointed by the Board to serve as President of the District.

About the Study

The Texas General Land Office (GLO) administers the federal Community Development Block Grant Disaster Recovery Program for the State of Texas. In 2013, the GLO entered into an agreement with the GCCPRD to conduct the Storm Surge Suppression Study, a technical, scientific based effort to investigate opportunities to alleviate the vulnerability of the upper Texas coast to storm surge and flooding. This study is an opportunity for the GCCPRD to assume a leadership role and work collaboratively with federal, state, local, and public and private institutions to develop a plan that meets the needs of the region and the nation.

Since receiving the GLO grant, the GCCPRD has collected and analyzed existing data, and collaborated with other organizations and universities that have conducted similar work. The Storm Surge Suppression Study team has begun the process of evaluating a system of alternatives consisting of a variety of natural, structural, and nonstructural methods. Using the findings of the evaluation process, the GCCPRD will recommend a cost effective and efficient system of flood damage reduction and storm surge suppression measures to help protect the six-county region.

The recommended measures may include a combination of different storm surge suppression methods functioning cooperatively. For example, implementation of one method may not be cost-effective for the entire six-county region. Once various alternatives are identified, the study team will host a second series of public meetings in the early spring of 2016 to receive feedback about the study findings.

The study is divided into three phases:

Phase 1 - The initial phase included the collection and analysis of existing studies, reports, and other background data. The Storm Surge Suppression Study team compiled over 100 geospatial files from various regional, state, and federal databases. In addition, a series of public scoping meetings was conducted in December of 2014 to obtain community input. Phase 1 of the study concluded on February 27, 2015.

The Phase 1 Report is available here for review, geospatial data can be found on the GCCPRD Geospatial Web Portal, and the data library can be found here.

Phase 2 - The second phase of the study is comprised of a major technical study and a report that includes storm surge modeling, alternatives development and analysis, and a thorough assessment of mitigation options for the region's communities, ecosystems, businesses, and industries. Once alternatives have been identified and assessed, the study team will host a second series of public meetings to solicit comments. The GCCPRD Geospatial Web Portal will be enhanced to include information regarding the possible impacts of each storm surge suppression alternative if constructed. Phase 2 of the study is estimated to conclude in February 2016.

Phase 3 - The final phase of the study will consist of a final report, utilizing the information gathered from Phases 1 and 2, outlining the Storm Surge Suppression Study team’s recommended system of flood damage reduction and storm surge suppression measures to better protect the six-county region. The entire study is estimated to conclude in June 2016.

For more information about the study, review a PowerPoint presentation about the study here.

- GCCPRD GEOSPATIAL WEB PORTAL AND DATA LIBRARY -

During Phase 1 of the Storm Surge Suppression Study, the study team compiled over 100 geospatial files from various regional, state, and federal databases. This information is summarized and available online for public review at the GCCPRD Geospatial Web Portal and the Data Library. These tools share the information gathered during all phases of the study and will be updated for stakeholders as further information is available.

Click here to visit the GCCPRD Geospatial Web Portal.

Click here to visit the GCCPRD Data Library.

During Phase 2 of the study, conceptual alternatives were developed for each study region. To explore these alternatives, please access the Storm Surge Modeling Web Portal and the Proposed Alternatives Web Portal.

Click here to visit the GCCPRD Storm Surge Modeling Web Portal.

Click here to visit the GCCPRD Proposed Alternatives Web Portal.

Frequently Asked Questions


What is the Gulf Coast Community Protection and Recovery District?

What is the purpose of this study?

Why is the study important?

Why has the study effort been delayed until now?

Will the public be provided with opportunities to participate in this study?

Who or how do I contact someone with a question or concern?

Who is leading the study?

How long will it take to conduct the study?

How will environmental impacts be considered?

What alternatives are being considered?

What will be the result of this study effort

What happens after the study is complete?

How will the proposed surge suppression plan be paid for?


Section 3 Compliance

The District has developed Section 3 Plan and Policies in compliance with Title 24 CFR Part 135 – Economic Opportunities for Low- and Very Low-Income Persons. Such plan is intended to ensure that employment andother economic opportunities generated by qualifying HUD financial assistance shall, to the greatest extent feasible, benefit persons and business identified in the regulation.

To review the Section 3 Plan and Polices, please download the document here.

 

What is the Gulf Coast Community Protection and Recovery District?

The Gulf Coast Community Protection and Recovery District (GCCPRD) is a local government corporation created by Brazoria, Chambers, Galveston, Harris, Jefferson, and Orange Counties. The GCCPRD is responsible for developing plans to address the impacts of future storms on the upper Texas coast.
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What is the purpose of the study?

The purpose of the Storm Surge Suppression Study is to investigate the feasibility of reducing the vulnerability of the upper Texas coast to storm surge and flood damages. This will be achieved through studying alternatives that could rely on natural or nature-based features, as well as nonstructural and structural measures.
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Why is the study important?

Hurricane Ike caused billions of dollars in damage, the loss of dozens of lives, and is estimated to be the third most destructive hurricane in U.S. history in terms of economic loss. As a result of Ike and its devastating impacts on the upper Texas coast, it is critically important to gather information, evaluate options, and develop a region-wide approach to better protect our communities from future natural disasters.
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Why has the study effort been delayed until now?

Undertakings like this study take a great deal of thought and planning, all the way from budgeting and commitment of public funds to developing the study process and implementation. Achieving the very best outcome requires meticulous planning and patience. We know we work for you. It is our intention to provide the most cost-effective, efficient recommendation on your behalf, and we invite you to participate in the study process through summer 2016.
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Will the public be provided with opportunities to participate in this study?

Throughout the life of the study, the Storm Surge Suppression study team will proactively encourage public feedback and participation. A second series of public meetings will be held in early spring 2016 to receive feedback about potential alternatives included in storm surge suppression plan. For more information about the study or to join the study mailing list, visit the ‘Get Involved’ section of this site.
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Who or how do I contact someone with a question or concern?

Please send your questions or requests for information to info@gccprd.com or use the comment submittal form in the ‘Get Involved’ section of this site.
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Who is the leading the study?

The Storm Surge Suppression Study is being led by the GCCPRD. The GCCPRD is made up of the six county judges within the study area including Brazoria, Chambers, Galveston, Harris, Jefferson, and Orange Counties, and the president of the GCCPRD is former Harris County judge, Robert Eckels. The GCCPRD is supported in leading the Storm Surge Suppression Study by a team of engineers, environmental scientists, economists, and community outreach specialists. The GCCPRD is not directly affiliated with any university or other organizations conducting concurrent and similar studies.
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How long will it take to conduct the study?

It is estimated that the entire study, including the final report and recommendations, will be completed by summer 2016.
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How will environmental impacts be considered?

The study process will consider the potential environmental effects of proposed actions and reasonable alternatives to those actions. This includes consideration of a broad range of potential environmental impacts, including natural, economic, and social effects, among others.
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What alternatives are being considered?

This study will identify multiple, viable alternatives that would provide storm surge protection for the six-county region. An expert team of technical, environmental, and engineering experts will investigate possible alternatives throughout the study process.

The study team will seek public input throughout the process. Stakeholder meetings and public scoping sessions will occur at intervals during the study, and web-based tools will be created to disseminate information and gather public feedback. Stakeholder ideas, issues, and concerns will be considered as conceptual alternatives are being evaluated by the team.
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What will be the result of this study effort?

The GCCPRD will recommend a cost-effective and efficient system of flood damage reduction and storm surge suppression measures to help protect the six-county region. The measures may consist of a variety of natural, structural, and nonstructural methods.

The team would like to stress that this is a conceptual planning study. When the GCCPRD identifies a viable system of flood damage reduction and storm surge suppression measures, extensive additional investigation and design will be necessary. The community will be informed and included every step of the way.
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What happens after the study is complete?

The final report will be presented to the Board of the GCCPRD and the Texas General Land Office (GLO) for review and comment. After review and acceptance by the GLO, the report will be made available to the public through the GCCPRD website and other pertinent public forums.
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How will the proposed surge suppression plan be paid for?

Once a system of alternatives has been identified, further analysis will need to be conducted to determine revenue sources. However, the final report will provide a list of potential funding methods identified from local, state, federal, and private sources.
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- Get Involved -

Public feedback and participation is encouraged throughout the duration of the study. A second series of public meetings will be held in early spring 2016 to receive feedback about potential alternatives included in storm surge suppression plan. Please submit questions or comments using the form below or send email to info@gccprd.com.

Join the Study Mailing List

To be included on the Storm Surge Suppression Study mailing list, please complete the form to the right.

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Provide your Comments

Please provide your personal experiences, ideas, comments, and feedback about the Storm Surge Suppression Study.

Comments will be accepted throughout the duration of the study. Written comments may be mailed to the Gulf Coast Community Protection and Recovery District in care of Col. Christopher Sallese at 3100 West Alabama St., Houston, Texas 77098 or emailed to info@gccprd.com. You may also submit your comments by using the form to the right.

 
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